Dot. Dot. Dot.

Dot. Dot. Dot. Inexactitude

Welcome to my world. Here you'll find oscillations between science, wackiness, fandoms, general nerdiness and geekery, and science. Did I mention science? Science.

"

He considered his answer carefully. Finally, he said that there was nothing he would like more in the world than to see his mother and father again, but that he had no reason—and no evidence—to support the idea of an afterlife, so he couldn’t give in to the temptation.

'Why?'

Then he told me, very tenderly, that it can be dangerous to believe things just because you want them to be true. You can get tricked if you don’t question yourself and others, especially people in a position of authority. He told me that anything that’s truly real can stand up to scrutiny.

"

Reblogged from thedragoninmygarage

Sasha Sagan, describing a time she asked her father, Carl Sagan, about life after death

How Carl Sagan Described Death To His Young Daughter | Popular Science

(via joshbyard)

thedragoninmygarage:

"Our entire universe emerged from a point smaller than a single atom. Space itself exploded in a cosmic fire, launching the expansion of the universe and giving birth to all the energy and all the matter we know today. I know that sounds crazy, but there is strong observational evidence to support the big bang theory. And it includes the amount of helium in the cosmos and the glow of radio waves left over from the explosion.” 

- Neil deGrasse Tyson, Cosmos

Reblogged from thedragoninmygarage

thedragoninmygarage:

"Our entire universe emerged from a point smaller than a single atom. Space itself exploded in a cosmic fire, launching the expansion of the universe and giving birth to all the energy and all the matter we know today. I know that sounds crazy, but there is strong observational evidence to support the big bang theory. And it includes the amount of helium in the cosmos and the glow of radio waves left over from the explosion.”

- Neil deGrasse Tyson, Cosmos

Reblogged from marswiggles

marswiggles:

Mastcam (L/R), Sol 595 — two versions of the same Kimberley Rock Mastcam wiggle, but with different fulcrums for parallax.

Reblogged from sagansense

staceythinx:

Orbital Mechanics by Tatiana Plakhova 

(Source: fubiz.net)

Reblogged from kqedscience

futurejournalismproject:

Cable on Climate Science

Via the Union of Concerned Scientists:

CNN, Fox News, and MSNBC are the most widely watched cable news networks in the U.S. Their coverage of climate change is an influential source of information for the public and policy makers alike.

To gauge how accurately these networks inform their audiences about climate change, UCS analyzed the networks’ climate science coverage in 2013 and found that each network treated climate science very differently.

Fox News was the least accurate; 72 percent of its 2013 climate science-related segments contained misleading statements. CNN was in the middle, with about a third of segments featuring misleading statements. MSNBC was the most accurate, with only eight percent of segments containing misleading statements.

Read the overview here, or jump to the study here (PDF).

Images: Science or Spin?: Assessing the Accuracy of Cable News Coverage of Climate Science, via Union of Concerned Scientists

wnderlst:

2014 Full Lunar Eclipse | Athichart Tangpong

Reblogged from fuckyeah-stars

wnderlst:

2014 Full Lunar Eclipse | Athichart Tangpong

Lessons of Immortality and Mortality From My Father, Carl Sagan

Reblogged from astrodidact

astrodidact:

BY SASHA SAGAN

image

We lived in a sandy-colored stone house with an engraved winged serpent and solar disc above the door. It seemed like something straight out of ancient Sumeria, or Indiana Jones — but it was not, in either case, something you’d expect to find in upstate New York….

beautifulmars:

Calligraphic Mars

Reblogged from beautifulmars

beautifulmars:

Calligraphic Mars

thenewenlightenmentage:

Astronomers Challenge Cosmological Model
Astronomers Professor Chris Collins and Dr Ian McCarthy from LJMU’s Astrophysics Research Institute are challenging the view that the currently preferred cosmological model of the Universe is correct by comparing recent measurements of the cosmic background radiation and galaxy clusters in two independent studies partly funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council.
One of the cornerstones of the Big Bang theory of the Universe is the cosmic background radiation (CBR). Discovered in 1965 these electro-magnetic waves bombard the Earth continuously from all directions at harmless microwave frequencies. However, the radiation arriving here has been cooled to only 2.7 degrees above absolute zero (as it traverses deep space) by the expansion of the universe; therefore, in the distant past the temperature would have been much higher. This leads us to the conclusion that the universe had a hot origin – the so called Big Bang – nearly 14 billion years ago.
Continue Reading

Reblogged from sagansense

thenewenlightenmentage:

Astronomers Challenge Cosmological Model

Astronomers Professor Chris Collins and Dr Ian McCarthy from LJMU’s Astrophysics Research Institute are challenging the view that the currently preferred cosmological model of the Universe is correct by comparing recent measurements of the cosmic background radiation and galaxy clusters in two independent studies partly funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council.

One of the cornerstones of the Big Bang theory of the Universe is the  (CBR). Discovered in 1965 these electro-magnetic waves bombard the Earth continuously from all directions at harmless microwave frequencies. However, the radiation arriving here has been cooled to only 2.7 degrees above absolute zero (as it traverses deep space) by the expansion of the universe; therefore, in the distant past the temperature would have been much higher. This leads us to the conclusion that the  had a hot origin – the so called Big Bang – nearly 14 billion years ago.

Continue Reading

engadget:

Toshiba’s vision for Project Ara extends to wearables and beyond

Reblogged from engadget

engadget:

Toshiba’s vision for Project Ara extends to wearables and beyond