Dot. Dot. Dot.

Dot. Dot. Dot. Inexactitude

Welcome to my world. Here you'll find oscillations between science, wackiness, fandoms, general nerdiness and geekery, and science. Did I mention science? Science.

gravitationalbeauty:

Young Stars in the Rho Ophiuchi Cloud

Reblogged from fuckyeah-stars

gravitationalbeauty:

Young Stars in the Rho Ophiuchi Cloud

streetartglobal:

Check out the incredible thread work of Perspicere in London on his new profile. http://globalstreetart.com/perspicere

Reblogged from wilwheaton

streetartglobal:

Check out the incredible thread work of Perspicere in London on his new profile. http://globalstreetart.com/perspicere

aufseherin:

Going under

Reblogged from 31262

aufseherin:

Going under

Reblogged from fuckyeah-stars

Norðurljós / Aurora borealis
Kristján Kristinsson

(Source: GIVNCVRLOS)

Reblogged from cosmo-nautic

mymodernmet:

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center’s breathtaking images of outer space are literally out of this world, inspiring awe at the sheer scale and beautiful mystery of the universe.

wiseyoungravenclaw:

See this guy? This is astronaut Ron McNair, and he was awesome.
In 1959, when he was nine-years-old, he single-handedly desegregated a South Carolina library by going in, picking some books, trying to check them out, and refusing to leave until he could take the books with him.
He went on to be a physicist and became the second African American in space when he flew on STS-41-B aboard Challenger in 1984.
When he was selected for STS-51-L, which was to be his second mission, a special piece of music was composed for him to play on his saxophone for what would have been the first original piece of music recorded in space.
McNair tragically died in 1986 when the shuttle disintegrated seconds after lift-off, claiming the lives of all seven members of the Challenger crew.
There’s even a kids’ book about him.

Reblogged from astrotastic

wiseyoungravenclaw:

See this guy? This is astronaut Ron McNair, and he was awesome.

In 1959, when he was nine-years-old, he single-handedly desegregated a South Carolina library by going in, picking some books, trying to check them out, and refusing to leave until he could take the books with him.

He went on to be a physicist and became the second African American in space when he flew on STS-41-B aboard Challenger in 1984.

When he was selected for STS-51-L, which was to be his second mission, a special piece of music was composed for him to play on his saxophone for what would have been the first original piece of music recorded in space.

McNair tragically died in 1986 when the shuttle disintegrated seconds after lift-off, claiming the lives of all seven members of the Challenger 
crew.

There’s even a kids’ book about him.

humanoidhistory:

The Einstein Tower (Einsteinturm), an astrophysical observatory in Potsdam, Germany, designed by Erich Mendelsohn, completed in 1921.

Reblogged from sagansense

humanoidhistory:

The Einstein Tower (Einsteinturm), an astrophysical observatory in Potsdam, Germany, designed by Erich Mendelsohn, completed in 1921.

(Source: blanchardmodernart.blogspot.com)

Reblogged from sagansense

retromantique:

silenceand-stars:

What Carl Sagan meant to me

I suppose it comes as nothing new to you all that Carl Sagan meant a great deal to many people. Not only did he give us knowledge, but a much richer view of the universe – a means of thinking with insatiable curiosity. It was this view that was and continues to remain my guiding light through darkness, in the same way the early Polynesians followed the stars.

Two years ago I was diagnosed with depression. A cloak of darkness followed me everywhere I went. I was living in a small universe, devoid of hope. I even began to consider death. That’s when I found Carl Sagan’s Cosmos. I suppose most people turn to religion in these situations. They want to be told god is looking out for them and there is some sort of master plan. But not for me, I was captivated by the way the light shined in his eyes when he talked about the universe. Here was a man who had found his happiness buried in the depths of reality, and to me it was beautiful. Carl gave me a far more enduring perspective of the universe, a universe of such size, vastness, complexity and beauty unable to be conceived by any human mind. I began to look up at the sky instead of walking with my head down. I started to think. My skies were no longer dark and empty but bathed in the light of 4 billion stars. To Carl, just experiencing this universe was an overwhelmingly beautiful experience. Consciousness was beautiful, the fact that I was so willing to give away my life when a man who had wanted nothing more than consciousness had lost his really spoke to me. I wanted not to waste my experience of this universe feeling blue, but I wanted to understand its fabric and carry on his legacy because he no longer could.

Carl Sagan is the kind of person I aspire to be, he was the star that I followed in times of doubt. I apologise for not giving him a beautiful poetic spiel that he so deserves, but there are no words. He is beautiful in every way conceivable, and he quite literally saved me in the most profound way by handing me the universe, and giving me the courage to look at it with my open eyes because you know what they say, in the darkest skies shine the brightest stars.

I’m sure Carl would have been very touched by your words. I know I was. Carl didn’t lead me out of depression, but he did give me a sense of purpose.

Let’s keep on giving the gift he bestowed on us and bring our brothers and sisters to open their eyes to and partake in the beauty of reality.

thefluffingtonpost:

PHOTO OP: Going Somewhere?
Via TheLake.

Reblogged from thefluffingtonpost

thefluffingtonpost:

PHOTO OP: Going Somewhere?

Via TheLake.

Reblogged from sagansense

educationalliberty:

Building the Machine - the Common Core Documentary

(Source: independentlearner)